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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
. for irene, i'll step out of the way. you can see irene, over 600,000 without power. of course, a lot of folks remember that. that was just a year ago with the derecho during one of our hottest times of the year and temperature over 100 degrees, we had a million people without power. that was the system that came in fast. and without of course, a lot of preparation. sandy, over 450,000 without power. so less of an impact in terms of power outages but a the downed trees throughout the area that had to be dealt with. such a large storm system that's having impact on the rest of the country. one that we will truly remember for quite a long time. 43 degrees is our current temperature with the south win at ten miles per hour. we're still feeling that moisture in the air. so as temperatures drop overnight, it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. in the 30s. 35, frederick. 38 in la plata. we'll have a lot more on sandy's aftermath coming up in a couple minutes. >> thanks. >>> the next big project when it comes to sandy is the clean-up. prince george's county bureau chief tracee wilkin
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
storm and look as the these from nasa, now sandy is there on your left and irene is on your right. sandy is about twice as big as irene and it is shortly downgraded after hurricane status, they will decide on approving a new tax and they have spent about 2. $5 million. the measure would add 1.5% tax on sugary drinks. now richmond's mayor said it is a good way to begin the fight against obesity. >> and we know it is the perfect place to start because it has absolutely no nutritional valley. it is twice the calories... >> it is going to result in higher grocery bills whether or not they drink soda. >> it is fun to buy it and they will be the first in the nation to impose a tax. >>> the giants dugout, they were expecting even bigger crowds after tomorrow's parade but authorities are worried about counterfeit money gear and they have confiscated 1200 shirts being sold illegally. you can tell it is counterfeit money if it lacks the hologram sticker. >>> and they are offering everybody in game two of the world series but you can get more from taco bell and if you happened to be there, it is an
in new york city, lower manhattan in the battery, right where i was for irene, major power problems, flooding and surge, damage and power losses narragansett, buzzard's bay, but regardless, both scenarios here mean major disruptions for transportation, and commerce, major losses of power, power damage, and brian, really both of the scenarios paint a multi-million or even billion disaster, we have to keep a close eye on this as it will affect, as you mentioned, millions of people. >> jim, there don't seem to be good options here, we'll watch the weather as we just begin the coverage of the storm as it makes its way up the east coast. >>> now as we mentioned, the furious campaigning for the office, just 12 days to go, new polling, the marist poll in colorado, showing a dead heat with romney and obama at 48, and nevada, obama has a slight lead, over romney, 50-47 right now then the state of ohio, peter alexander traveling with the romney campaign in defiance, ohio, good evening peter. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, these days the "o" in ohio could be optimism, this is the mos
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
. irene on the right. and sandy is about twice as large as last year's irene. this year's storm made landfall yesterday. shortly after being downgraded from hurricane status. >>> next week voters -- measure n would add a one-cent per ounce tax on sodas. the no on measure n campaign has spent $2.5 million to blanket live monday -- richmond with billboards at a town hall meeting last night, richmond's mayor says the measure n is a good way to begin the fight against obesity. >> we know that soda is the perfect place because it gets no nutritional value. it's empty calories. >> this tax is gonna equate -- is an aggressive tax that will result in higher grocery bills. >> the no on measure n campaign is funded by the beverage industry. if it passes, richmond could become the first in the country to impose the tax. >>> and giants' fans are beying up world series championship gear. federal agents are warning you make sure what you are buying is legal. the giants' dugout store at the ballpark was busy. they are expecting bigger crowds before and after the parade. the merchandise there, that'
for hurricane irene, several billion related to that. does it m needle from a macro point of view? >> from the top level, not really so much. obviously the damage has to be paid for and obviously that might mean infrastructure spending. so you take away from with one hand, you gain with the other. obviously different sectors will have different takes and so on. i think the thing we're thinking about at the moment is that the u.s. economy together with the global economy is very fragile. we have low growth if not recession in europe and i think the financial markets are also very fragile, not justs because they're struggling to make gains where you have the tug of war between the core fundamentals versus the central bank liquidity, but volume has been so thin all year and then we have this event which could dry up the volume further. so things are flanragile. >> and low volume means liquid markets and could see dislocations? >> if we see for whatever reason some sort of selling coming into the market with low liquidity, you could see the market can down quite quickly. >> basically whenever
the outer banks, they're worried that could be washed out, parts of it, as happened back with irene. people are paying close attention to the radar, watching the track of the storm. just to see how it affects this area. >> but clearly, george, the streets are pretty dezrted around there, are they not? a lot of vacation homes, as you mentioned, some folks who are living there kind of part time. of those who have decided to kind of wait out the storm, are you hearing very much from them? >> they're seeking higher ground. they're not leaving the island. some people have left, but a lot of people are staying to ride the storm out, going to hotels, going to areas around the outer banks here where they know it's higher ground. they also know the spots that flood. and that's what they're keeping an eye on. >> thanks so much, george. we'll check back with you momentarily. meantime, let's head north now. virginia is one of the places that is also concerned about what the storm could bring. athena jones is in a really beautiful part of virginia, northern virginia now, old town alexandria where it loo
, connecticut, long island, new jersey, than irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a new york city police officer accused of plotting to kidnap, rape, kill, cook and cannibalize as many as 100 women is being held without bail. the 28-year-old officer is accused of illegally accessing a national crime database to locate potential targets. he did not enter a plea in court today. >>> lee boyd malveaux told the "today" show he was sexually abused by john alan mohammed, the master will did mind mind o attacks that terrorized the washington area in 2002, saying he knew it was wrong but didn't have the willpower to say no. he was 17 at the time of the attacks and he was 15 when his acco
we saw with hurricane irene. interior sections for northern vermont and those things probably not as bad. coastal areas absolutely. here is a look at this storm right now doesn't look all that impressive. it looks big. you talk about this being a nor'easter. it's pulling all of this tropical moisture. storms hold a lot more moisture. you can have that much moisture ringing out into a nor'easter. that's why the rain is going to be so significant and going to be a very windy storm. rain already into florida. and we have had that there for 36 hours now. tonight moves in across parts of the carolinas. gets worse. the track does typically does. the start it moves off towards the northeast. then it cuts back toward the west. this is where it gets very interesting. don't pay that much attention to this. this category one hurricane. it's not going to be a typical hurricane and it's going to be strengthening as it makes landfall. we're going to be talking about major problems here. look at one of these models. anywhere you see the green and the blue, that's heavy rain. that's from main
a memory of irene last year. we saw the flooding from a tropical storm near new york city. shows you the size and scope of storms and how they can affect states far from the coasts. the wind gusts now are strong. kill devil hills, well over tropical storm-force winds. we're seeing them over 40 miles per hour in virginia beach. just the beginning. the winds tonight and tomorrow are going to pick up enormously. gusts will be hurricane force all the way across boston, through new york city through philadelphia. 80 mile-per-hour gusts. these -- these are the type of gusts that will knock down trees and cause major power outages. notice, the wind advisories extend into ohio and pennsylvania, as well. want to mention this time of year, october, this is when weast beautiful -- we have the beautiful changing of the leave colors, trees are heavy with the leaves. when they fall, they will fall hard. this is a heavy puncher. we have rain tuesday, then beyond that, wednesday into thursday with the storm. some of the heaviest rain in the mid-atlantic coming in steadily and staying there. that's w
year during irene there was a lot of talk that it came in as a strong tropical storm, but this will be a strong storm and a large one, and they will impact us many many different ways. one of the ways we'll be impacted, and it was noted on the last hurricane advisory was it was storm surge. that's not just the rain falling from the sky. we're going to get a lot of rain, and we'll see the piling up of the water in dangerous areas, possibly long island sound or even new york harbor. what happens when the hurricane winds -- once it starts getting into that shallow coastal area, it has nowhere else to go, brook, but up and out and inland. storm surge can travel many, many miles. we've seen that before with past hurricanes. this is a big concern for this system particularly, amongst many others like power outages. >> okay. sort of like the perfect storm all these conditions coming together. we'll look for it monday night into tuesday. bonnie, thank you. >>> big heads up on some supreme court cases we're going to be watching for this week. it could stop you from getting rid
year, when irene came through here, and at some point, on the island, the bay actually touched the atlantic ocean. now, also reminiscent is what's going on in new york city, and that's that the mass transit has been shut down and we're talking the subways. the buses and the trains there. 5 million people go through their daily, so, really crippling that area, and you saw new york city mayor michael bloom berg and he's saying that the 1.1 million kids and city schools will not be going to class tomorrow. however, the new york stock exchange will be open, harris. >> harris: they're going to run on generators we understand and have electronic voting down on the new york stock exchange and anna kooiman, thank you very much. we're getting your images of the behemoth storm, and this is your point of view. patty shea snapped photos at rudy's inlet at virginia beach. wow. paul blare sending this photo of his brother ben pelted by rain and high winds in virginia bridge. and david d'amico from long port, new jersey, as it's coming up from that area, south of new york. and massive waves c
, or sifma, says the bond market will remain closed tomorrow. a move they did not make during hurricane irene. >> sifma recommends closing u.s. government securities trading in tokyo and london as well. joining us on the phone to talk about that and more is sifma president and ceo, tim ryan. thanks for joining us here. >> thanks for being there. actually, both you, bill, and maria. >> your feeling is if they don't trade in new york, they shouldn't trade dollar-denominated currencies around the world. >> our recommendation was to close early today at noon. we chose to do it at noon principally because there were treasury auctions scheduled today. we wanted to get those finished. we recommended a close tomorrow. >> what about this cme report just moments ago that says overnight trading will happen at 7 p.m. tonight. how does that play into everything? i guess we want your take on the overall impact of a full market shutdown, like we're seeing, and what you're recommendation. >> well, remember, we recommend to our member firms, so they'll make the decision on cme on their own. typically when we
thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> we actually got engaged here last year and the storm came in and we had to leave early and now we're here. we got married, on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. >> isn't it good luck though to rain on your wedding day? if you can find the silver lining and try to tie that in. >> we'll check back in with them in a couple years. see how they're doing. >>> coming up on news 4 today a holiday hallmark. a rush to give the national christmas tree its debut before sandy steals the show. >>> protecting your property from flooding. liz crenshaw shares some do it yourself projects you can do now before the storm. >>> remember, storm team 4 is tracking the hurricane sandy on air and online. sign up for breaking news alerts on nbc washington.com. also follow us on facebook and >>> take a look at sandy. the system is now a tropical storm but still has the potential to regain its hurricane status as it inches up the east coast and of course everyone around here and all across the easte
here. we've dealt with snowmageddon. we survived irene a few years back. some of us remember agnes, a mother of all storms, we're still here, still standing. as we will be after this one as a memory. here's the second reason. it might not be as bad as it could be. let's put our collective energy together and send that thought out into the universe. always keep in mind, though, the fundamental truth that my aunt used to lay on me all the time, boy, she said, youe got to remember, that man poses and god disposes. >> amen. >> take a deep breath. >>> "nightly news" next. [ earnest ] out of the blue one day, we were told to build a 30-foot stage. gathered the guys and we built that 30-foot stage, not knowing what it was for. just days later, all three shifts were told to assemble in the warehouse. a group of people walked out on that stage and told us that the plant is now closed and all of you are fired... i looked both ways, i looked at the crowd, and...we all just lost our jobs. we don't have an income. mitt romney made over 100 million dollars by shutting down our plant and devastat
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toƩ@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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